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How do you turn a culture of uncertainty into one of opportunity?

Organizations thrive when every team member understands the core values of the company, and everything they do centers around these values.

The challenge of today’s workplace is that there have been monumental shifts in the way we function in everyday life, both in and out of the office. The sense of uncertainty is highly disruptive in the workplace, and it’s uncomfortable for everyone.

So, how can managers keep their team motivated, focused on the core values and productive when the future can seem ambiguous?

It starts with Purpose.

To help people find the resiliency to carry on and stay focused, leaders need to first acknowledge the feeling of uncertainty, then focus on realigning each member with the importance of their role and their purpose at work.

How does their role contribute to the core values and growth of their company? What personal value to they gain from their work? Do they have access to the resources and support they need? Do they feel heard and valued?

Reestablishing, or in some cases, rebuilding the foundation of each team member’s purpose will ultimately help drive them toward incredible results.

The strongest cultures are the ones that tie each team members contribution to a deeper meaning and purpose. Purpose truly drives people to care about their work and thrive in the face of adversity.

When employees have a strong sense of purpose, it builds resiliency.

Employees who have a strong, emotional connection to the work they do are able to better cope when facing organizational shifts. They are able to develop the protective factors required to deal with the stress of change.

Having a strong sense of purpose helps people see that their work directly contributes to achieving the larger, core goals of their team and their company. They feel reassured that their work matters, they have value in their company, and they are truly a part of the what makes the company successful.

Purpose leads to productivity.

High employee engagement is unquestionably linked to higher productivity, and although it’s not the only factor, it plays a significant role in employee happiness.

In today’s workplace many employees are having to do more work with fewer resources. So how can we ensure high levels of productivity despite these challenges?

By ensuring each employee has a strong sense of their purpose. Employees at purpose-driven companies report feeling more engaged with their work and productive during their workday.

Purpose is more important than pay.

Research has shown us that employee happiness and a better sense of well-being at work is valued more than salary, benefits and company perks.

When we focus on trading someone’s efforts for money we turn them into mercenaries — and it makes sense. People who are ‘in it for the money’ tend to only work hard enough to keep their job.

Today’s workforce has shown they want to take a proactive approach toward their personal happiness and well-being, and part of this is feeling like their job has meaning and purpose.

Purpose unlocks potential.

When companies miss out on opportunities to underline their larger vision and mission, their employees often end up sitting idle within their organization. They are waiting for a reason to throw themselves into their work.

When a company’s mission strongly resonates with its employees, they feel a greater connection to their purpose. Once they have purpose, they have the ability to unlock their true potential.

Purpose drives people.

Purpose is the most important element in having a great employee experience, maintaining high levels of engagement, and creating a phenomenal organizational culture.

If you want your team to care about your organization and strive to help its success, you have to give them purpose. Purpose drives people!

 

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